An American NGO in Lviv dedicated to helping families find safety and opportunity.

American Service in Ukraine (ASIU) is one of the very few American-founded organizations approved by the Ukrainian government, and currently operating in Ukraine.

Originally a professional support service for partnered organizations working in western Ukraine, ASIU quickly pivoted to respond to the Biden administration’s announcement of the “Uniting for Ukraine” humanitarian immigration program.

Now, ASIU is the foremost organization facilitating humanitarian immigration from Ukraine to the United States.

ASIU’s trilingual staff in Ukraine, from left to right: Aswar, Mike, Sofiia, and Kelly.

What is an I-134?

An I-134 is an online form filed by an American citizen with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). It’s basically an American citizen telling the US government, “Hey, I think this Ukrainian family needs help. You should consider them for humanitarian immigration.”

It opens up the way for an Ukrainian family to get humanitarian status from the US government.

It doesn’t cost you anything.
It doesn’t commit you to anything.
It takes barely any time to fill out.
But, for an Ukrainian family, it’s life changing.

Who can file an I-134?

Odds are: you! An I-134 filer should be an American citizen, with a job, who pays their taxes.

> Step 1 (of 3): Gather your “three documents.”

You’ll need just three documents to prove that you are an American citizen, with a job, who pays their taxes. These can be scanned copies or photos.

1. A letter of employment,

including your job title, start date, and current salary.  Use this easy template in Google Docs!

2. A proof of citizenship,

like the bio page of a US passport, a US birth certificate, or a US naturalization certificate.

3. Your most recent IRS tax return.

If you haven’t filed for last year, yet, that’s totally fine. Just get the return for the most recent year you have.

> Step 2: Get an Ukrainian family’s biodata from us.

Once you have your three documents, simply message us to get the verified data you’ll need to file for an Ukrainian family.

> Step 3: Submit the I-134 form online.

Simply go to uscis.gov/I-134 and fill out the form with the data you have. It’s free, and it takes about 10-15 minutes per submission.

And you’re done!

Nothing else is asked of you. You simply file this form and move on with your day. ASIU and our partnered resettlement agencies will take it from here, and make sure our Ukrainian friends are set up for success in America.

A common (and smart) question from ASIU’s I-134 filers is “What exactly am I committing to?”

If you are filing an I-134 using data provided by ASIU, you are not committing to provide anything beyond the submission of the form, legally or practically. The I-134 is an unique document in the American humanitarian process, in that it is not legally binding.

NOTE: The I-134 is sometimes confused with the I-864, a similar form used for traditional (i.e. nonhumanitarian) immigration. The I-864 IS legally binding. You are not filling out the I-864.

Here is a document from the Catholic Legal Immigration Network that explains further: https://cliniclegal.org/file-download/download/public/67300 Even more information can be found on the websites for Sound Immigration, Immigration Direct, Citizen Path, and many others. Please be wary of for-profit websites when performing research.

It opens up the way for an Ukrainian family to get humanitarian status from the US government.

It doesn’t cost you anything.
It doesn’t commit you to anything.
It takes barely any time to fill out.
But, for an Ukrainian family, it’s life changing.

“If it’s non-committal, why is it even needed?”

The US government responded to the Ukrainian crisis extremely fast by US immigration standards. One of the streamlining tactics was to identify displaced Ukrainians as “humanitarian parolees” instead of refugees.

Humanitarian parolees are generally required to have an American file an I-134 for them. This is usually not a hassle: most have some connections in the US, though short of deep family or employer connections expected in traditional immigration. The I-134 is
considered a smart step to help most humanitarian parolees build a safety net for themselves.

But the Ukrainians arriving now are far more akin to refugees than the average humanitarian parolee, and the I-134 has become more of a roadblock than a safety net. Canada, for instance, removed barriers like this for Ukrainians coming to their country. ASIU hopes the US government follows suit, but until then, we are working within the rules of the system: if the US government insists on an I-134 before they’ll consider helping an Ukrainian family, we’ll get them an I-134.

“But don’t Ukrainians need help once they arrive?”

They do, but not necessarily from you, the I-134 filer. This is why ASIU has invested time and energy into building partnerships with trusted, federally supervised resettlement agencies who are far better positioned — and ready — to provide arriving Ukrainians with the resources and services they need to thrive in America.

If you would like to be more involved and provide support to families beyond filing the I-134, ASIU more than welcomes it! Simply email us and we will connect you with a local resettlement agency to get you involved in a meaningful way.

“What guarantee do I have that I will not be negatively impacted by filing the I-134?”

While there can never be a guarantee in the American legal system that someone won’t make a claim against someone else, ASIU offers two precautions to ensure that your risk and liability is virtually zero.

1. The ASIU intake office in Ukraine explicitly confirms with our receiving families that they forego in perpetuity any possible claim to support from the I-134 filer.

2. ASIU makes a direct and binding commitment to our I-134 filers to be held liable in their place, in the extremely unlikely event that any liability is found in a court of law.

Contact the American Service in Ukraine